Jo’s Monday Walk: Our Beach

Back to this end of Bingie this week …. the walk we do nearly every day, a few minutes through the bush, across the lagoon, and along the beach. I started photographing mushrooms, the tiny ones that come up in our marsupial lawn, but once we neared the lagoon we could see something very unusual … pelicans! Mullimburra ICOLL is small, pelicans have many bigger bodies of water nearby to visit, but here they were.

We first saw them further up the lagoon, with a pair of Chestnut Teal. Once they cruised east and saw us they decided to fly! The lagoon is still running out after all the rain, in fact it rained several times yesterday, so the ground is draining freely towards theΒ sea. Water testing on Sunday revealed the lagoon water as completely fresh. Imagine how fishes need to adapt to the changing salinity in these environments!

Mullimburra ICOLL open and flowing out

Mullimburra ICOLL open and flowing out

There was no time to play this morning, but a little stream through the sand is like a slice of heaven. I hope the 4yr old comes over soon!

fresh water stream to the sea

fresh water stream to the sea

You could look for seaweed here if you like, or forage amongst the rocks … but lets walk down the beach towards Meringo. If we are lucky we will see a pair of Pied Oystercatchers, endangered birds we are trying to help recover. Dogs and vehicles on the beach make it difficult for them to nest safely. Yes, here is number 75 and his mate!

number 75

number 75

Big seas rumble and rush this morning, but the tide is low, walking is easy. Looking out to Shag Rock we see it disappearing behind the breaking waves.

Shag Rock in a veil of spray

Shag Rock in a veil of spray

and don’t be tempted to swim this morning, those waves are dumpers!

oh no! crashing down!

oh no! crashing down!

At the base of Meringo Headland there is some kind of kerfuffle amongst the rocks …. I see a gull dancing about, a Sooty Oystercatcher Β and a White-faced heron. There must be something delicious right there, something the Silver Gull would prefer to have all to itself.

three birds in a stand-off

three birds in a stand-off

Perhaps it is a lump of CunjevoiΒ that has been broken off by the waves and dumped onto the beach, like this one. Cunjevoi have soft tasty insides, for all their rough outer appearance. Like some people we know! Cunjevoi is a Sea squirt, and was a common food source for Aboriginal people, but is now mainly used as fishing bait. Birds find it tasty, as do fish. I hope that big lump of Cunjie washes out again, for it develops the most awful smell as it breaks down!

large Cunjevoi mass on the beach

large Cunjevoi mass on the beach

So now it is time to walk back through the trees, along the track used by more and more people all the time. There are several horse riders who bring their animals through, cutting up the soft sand track, and recently a man on a quad bike has been widening the track with his big wheels. The horse riders cut the trees to remove obstacles, the wheels just flatten and kill the plants that grow along the path. So just ignore the changes and enjoy the birds in the trees as you pass!

winding through the trees

winding through the trees

Thanks for joining me on the walk … why not go and visit Jo who was walking in Glasgow this week!

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35 thoughts on “Jo’s Monday Walk: Our Beach

  1. What a contrast to Jo’s Glasgow walk. My favourite is Shag Rock in a veil of spray. I’ve just returned from my Tuesday walk, south of Bingie. I’m not a birdwhisperer like you, but I can capture fungi – they let me get close, and they stay still!

    • yes, love those well-behaved fungi! My photos are not much good since I am reluctant to kneel on the ground because of ticks … I walked into a nest of them (minute invisible nymphs) a few days ago and still have itchy lumps all over the place 😦

  2. The waves are wonderful – if deadly! – Christine. I’m so glad you shot them for us to see. I do love the sea when it’s wild and wilful like that! Speaking of which – how far is your ICOLL from the sea? I can see the stream trickling out is pretty small, which means that although the barrier was broken in the storm the tide isn’t reaching up into the ICOLL, right? It’s all so delicately poised, isn’t it? Sad about the track. I don’t suppose you can persuade the Council to put a couple of bollards at each end?

    • yes those waves were really whacking down on the beach today … I remember being caught under one many years ago … the ICOLL is about 20 metres from the sea, really close, but usually closed off, which is why we so love to see it open … the waves go right in, but not far up the lagoon … I guess so much rain has made it fresh pretty close to the sea … yes delicately poised is a lovely way to say it … we will have to speak to National Parks and see if they have any ideas πŸ™‚

  3. ancora immagini meravigliose Cristine, dal vostro mondo selvaggio ed incantato! sono pellicani bianchi quelli che sembrano barchette di carta, o cosa d’altro?
    buon giorno cara amica
    still wonderful images Cristine, from your wild and enchanted world! White Pelicans are those that look like paper boats, or what else?
    good morning, dear friend

  4. You have no idea how much I needed a walk on the beach, even virtually it has made a great difference, and it was nice to say hello to the bird life πŸ™‚

    • I love how we are able to share our worlds online through the blogs … takes us out of ordinary reality and into non-duality … here I am walking on the beach, walking in the hills, in autumn and spring … beautifully wild!

      • Yes, I agree with you – it feels like such a privilege to communicate with people from all over the world and participate in their sometimes very different (and opposite) lives. I like your “non-duality” term for this πŸ™‚

  5. I’d be cross if I saw a quad bike charging through, horses are just about okay as long as the riders behave. I hope 21st century man doesn’t wreck things. It took me a while to realise that these cunjevoi are animals, I wonder how they ended up with the same name. A lovely walk as always, thanks dear Christine and pelicans too, how amazing!

    • when I saw the quad bike last I stood on the beach watching him so he stayed on the grass and zoomed around a bit and went back …. but if no-one is there he comes onto the beach … I feel a bit like we are holding out against the hordes! Yes cunjevoi are animals, big seas always break a few chunks off the rocks and wash them in to the shore … yes we were thrilled to see the pelicans!

  6. What a wonderful, peaceful way to start the day, Christine, and what a privilege to live somewhere with all that on your doorstep. How dare they endanger no. 75? What a sweetheart! I wanted to splash through that shimmy of water with your 4 year old, too! Happy days πŸ™‚
    So many thanks again for joining in, Christine. This walk was balm to my soul.

  7. I showed your Shag Rock picture to E.g. to hear her thoughts on how you photographed it. She guessed a medium-slow shutter speed, and that maybe the wind was blowing hard enough towards the sea that you caught those “veils” along the wave crests. Neither of us have seen a photo like that.

    • hey, that is great! all with no effort πŸ˜‰ the shutter speed was slow, dark clouds in the sky, but tricky with bright sunlight hitting the sea on the horizon … I fluked it!

  8. Your surroundings are a veritable national park Christine!!! No. 75 is gorgeous…what bird is it? I went pelican hunting last week, but there weren’t as many as I had expected and my zoom wasn’t powerful enough to capture much detail.

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