Beach Art

A brilliant morning drew us to the beach although the waves were roaring and we did not anticipate a swim! Huge swells associated with the Virgo Full Moon had washed into the lagoon, bringing renewed life from the sea. Scum and seaweed floats swirled together forming patterns that reformed over and over again with the wash from our barefoot walking.

froth and weed

froth and weed

Rushing waves had inscribed mysterious ciphers into the sand, telling the story of their overnight incursion, now overlaid with early morning appendices of small crab journeys.

ripples and crab marks

ripples and crab marks

Some formed petals, flowering earth deities made visible by the passage of the full moon.

flowing petals

flowing petals

Seaweeds were neatly arranged, this one like ready-to-wear jewellery, a perfect necklace in autumn colours.

seaweed necklace

seaweed necklace

Pumice stone was widely spread, still reaching our shores from an undersea eruption by the Havre Seamount in July 2013 in the Kermadac Islands, north of NZ. This eruption formed the largest pumice raft seen in the last fifty years, so we will be picking up pumice for years to come.

pumice and seaweed

pumice and seaweed

Huge swells rumbled noisily onto the shore, sunlight glistening in spray, colours shifting through blues and greens. I was not surfing today!

big waves

big waves

We found the usual kinds of debris to be carried home and put into the bin for the trip to the tip one day. Balloons, their clips and ribbons, bits of plastic, a bottle, and an unusual purple can, with some small hitchhikers. I wonder where it came from? Do you recognise the writing?

can from the sea

can from the sea

We crossed back over the lagoon on our way home through the forest, and stopped for a moment to watch seagulls and teal foraging in the newly replenished waters.

autumn lagoon

autumn lagoon

I hope you enjoyed the walk, you can uncover your ears now!

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20 thoughts on “Beach Art

  1. Whoever invented end paper marbling must have lived by the sea.

    The tin: hiragana large print with kanji small print? The second-last kanji (Chinese?) word is “grain”, which doesn’t provide much help identifying a food tin decorated with a suggested-serving photo, does it? 🙂

  2. Love your description: I particularly like the “early morning appendices of small crab journeys”. The seaweed necklace is not unlike the beautiful quipu in the Gold and the Incas exhibition, which I was assured could even be used to record a poem.

    Thanks for the information about the source of the pumice. I’ve been wondering as it continues to mark the tidelines of my beach too.

  3. I’m here exploring, catching up with things I missed while my life was so busy. It’s wonderful, delightful, and amazing to know that you are still here, Christine, in your blog. I so wish we had met, but then again, I feel as if we did meet in some way beyond the physical face to face meetings.

    To Stuart: I know you through Christine and through her final post which you so beautifully and lovingly wrote. I can’t come up with any words to say what I really want to say: An expression of love and appreciation. A nod of understanding when I read about how you were sometimes jealous of the time Christine spent with those of us in her blogging neighborhood. I wish that at some point we could sit and speak and I could tell you how Christine saved my life and sanity with her friendship, her calmness, her love and light, her comments on my blog, her generosity in sending me one of her essences when I most needed it, Some day, if it’s meant to be, perhaps it will happen and we’ll meet. I firmly believe we are all a part of her beautiful dreaming.

    In case it matters, in case you want to know, here is my goodbye to Christine:
    http://breezesatdawn.wordpress.com/2014/07/02/beauty-does-not-linger/

    I miss her, yet I see her everywhere, in her words, her images, and her teachings.

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