Our Beach: Canon D20 again

pippi trail

pippi trail

Next morning I took the D20 again to learn a bit more about it. Here is the fascinating trail left by a small pipi as it moved and reburied itself while the tide was going out.

large pipi shell

large pipi shell

Pipis are bi-valve molluscs that formed an important part of the local Koori’s diet before white people came along with their flour and sugar.

bird catches pipi

bird catches pipi

Now only the oystercatchers eat them. I love to follow their footprints and see the open shells where they have been deftly dug up, opened and consumed!  Can you see the tiny open shell? and the hole from where it was excavated? Usually they dig bigger pipis!

crab trail

crab trail

Crabs live under the sand too, emerging when the time is right. They leave a row of little scrapes and tiny balls of sand.

crab trail

crab trail

Walking in the morning at low tide is fascinating, identifying all the little signs left by nocturnal visitors. I saw fox prints too, and dog prints made by a neighbour illegally walking his German Shepherd in the National Park. Someone spoke to him about it recently, and he reassured them that his dog never chases birds, even though at that time the dog was leaping and barking to set a flock of seagulls in the air.

seaweeds

seaweeds

There is usually some seaweed on our beach, often the kelp we gather and eat Japanese style, or collect to put into our seaweed tea to fertilise the garden. These two are not kelp, but there is one below.

golden kelp

this is a small prickly golden kelp

The one we eat is common kelp, Eklonia radiata. Kelps are brown algaes, that contain at least 60 different minerals and elements, as well as 12 vitamins and 21 amino acids. They are harvested from beaches for food, fertiliser and use in cosmetics!

common kelp

common kelp

Thanks for coming on my morning walk …. I hope you like the new camera … I really like that I can leave it on the beach and go for a swim without worrying that sand will wreck it. I like the photos too.

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19 thoughts on “Our Beach: Canon D20 again

  1. I love the photos! There is a seaweed that is eaten here – well in North Devon – it’s made into lavabread and has quite a short season. I’ve never tried it though, not too sure I’d like it!

  2. A fascinating walk indeed. The shot of the prickly kelp is particularly beautiful. I am thinking it can’t all be credited to the camera, the ‘eyes’ of the person behind is so evident 🙂

  3. Lovely natural history shots. We don’t have Pipi’s in the UK so our Oystercatchers eat Mussels and Cockles instead. If they’re forced inland by the weather then they dig for worms.

    • that is so interesting! I just took part in a bird counting operation, focussed on the Oystercatchers and others who are suffering from predation of their nesting sites … also noticed new birds here, perhaps a result of the warming climate ??

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